Reunions 2022 took place May 19 – 22, 2022. Here is an archive of events: 

Loading Events

« All Events

  • This event has passed.

Alumni-Faculty Forum: Revolutionizing Medicine: Breaking Through Disease

May 20 @ 8:45 am - 10:00 am

AFF - Revolutionizing Medicine

McCosh Hall, Room 50

Sponsored by the Alumni Association of Princeton University


Moderator

Yibin Kang
Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis Professor of Molecular Biology, Princeton University

Panelists

Marvin J. Slepian ’77
Director of the Arizona Center for Accelerated Biomedical Innovation and Regents’ Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Engineering, University of Arizona

Christopher P. Austin ’82
CEO, Vesalius Therapeutics and CEO-Partner, Flagship Pioneering

Marc I. Diamond ’87
Director of the Center for Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Diseases, and Distinguished Chair in Brain Injury and Repair, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

Diya Das ’12
Data Planning and Sharing Lead, Development Sciences Informatics Data Management, Genentech


Moderator

YKYibin Kang
Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis Professor of Molecular Biology, Princeton University

Yibin Kang’s research focuses on the molecular mechanisms of breast cancer metastasis. His work discovered new genes that promote progression, metastasis, immune evasion and treatment resistance of breast cancer, delineated tumor-stromal interactions that are essential for metastatic growth, identified novel regulators of normal and cancerous stem cells, and developed new cancer therapeutic agents. Kang has published original articles in leading journals including Science, Cancer Cell, Nature Cell Biology, Nature Cancer and Nature Medicine. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Fidler Innovation Award from the Metastasis Research Society, the Fuller Albright Award from the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research and the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Outstanding Investigator Award in Breast Cancer Research. Kang is a Fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science, a Komen Scholar and an inaugural inductee of the Duke Graduate School Few-Glasson Alumni Society. He was selected as an American Cancer Society Research Professor in 2019. Kang is a founding member of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Princeton Branch and an associate director of Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. He is a co-founder and chair of the scientific advisory board of Firebrand Therapeutics Inc. and Kayothera Inc., two biotech startups based on technologies developed in his group and focusing on novel therapeutics for late-stage metastatic cancers. He has served as president of the Metastasis Research Society, chair of the AACR Tumor Microenvironment Working Group and president of the Chinese Biological Investigator Society. He came to Princeton in 2004.

Panelists
MS

Dr. Marvin Slepian, a professor and associate department head of BioMedical Engineering, a McGuire Scholar in the Eller College of Management, director of the newly created Arizona Center for Accelerated Biomedical Innovation (ACABI). Photograph by John de Dios for UA News.

Marvin Slepian ’77
Director of the Arizona Center for Accelerated Biomedical Innovation and Regents’ Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Engineering, University of Arizona

Marvin Slepian is founder and director of the Arizona Center for Accelerated Biomedical Innovation – an across-the-university “creativity engine” driving innovation, novel solution development and real-world translation. He holds professorships in medicine, medical imaging, materials sciences, chemical and environmental engineering, and biomedical engineering, where he is the associate department head; he also is the McGuire Scholar in the Eller College of Management. In parallel with his clinical career, Slepian has had an extensive research career leading to the development of innovative diagnostics and therapeutics for cardiovascular diseases. His work has focused on novel biomaterials for tissue engineering, drug delivery and medical device development. His lab has developed many novel diagnostics and therapeutics including: stent coatings, surgical anti-adhesive barriers, stretchable and biodegradable electronics, and cardiovascular prosthetic devices, including the only FDA-approved total artificial heart. Slepian has founded numerous medical-device companies, including FOCAL, Endotex, Angiotrax, Hansen Medical, Arsenal, 480 BioMedical, MC10 and SynCardia. He is an elected fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors and is an elected member of the Biomaterials Engineering Materials and Applications Roundtable of the National Research Council of the National Academies. He is past president of the International Society for Mechanical Circulatory Support and is the immediate past president of the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs.

CA

Christopher Austin ’82
CEO, Vesalius Therapeutics and CEO-Partner, Flagship Pioneering

Christopher Austin is a CEO-partner at Flagship Pioneering in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In that role, he serves as CEO of Vesalius Therapeutics, a Flagship ecosystem biotechnology company developing treatments for common diseases, and works on the creation and operation of new Flagship companies. Before joining Flagship in 2021, Austin served for almost a decade as the founding director of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS ) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), where he formulated the strategic vision and scientific directions of the new center. He led its efforts in developing, demonstrating and disseminating scientific and operational advances across the spectrum of translational science to get more treatments to more patients more quickly, from target validation to preclinical therapeutic development to clinical trials to community health implementation. Before NCATS, Austin founded and directed a number of scientific and technology initiatives at the National Human Genome Research Institute at NIH to derive biological insights and therapeutic potential from the human genome. Austin came to NIH in 2002 from Merck, where his work focused on genome-based discovery of novel targets and drugs, with a particular focus on common complex neuropsychiatric diseases. He received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School, did clinical training in internal medicine and neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital and completed a research fellowship in genetics at Harvard.

MDMarc Diamond ’87
Director of the Center for Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Diseases and Distinguished Chair in Brain Injury and Repair, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

Marc Diamond is an internationally recognized expert in neurodegenerative disease, lecturing frequently at major universities and scientific meetings around the world. He is the founding director of the Center for Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Diseases (CAND) at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The CAND is a multidisciplinary translational research program comprised of 11 faculty members who are focused on fundamental disease mechanisms. Its mission is to develop more effective diagnosis and therapy for Alzheimer’s and related disorders. His original discoveries linked common conditions such as Alzheimer’s to rare infectious prion disorders such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob and “mad cow” disease, transforming our understanding of how different neurodegenerative diseases arise and why they progress. His ideas underlie new treatment strategies currently being pursued by the pharmaceutical industry, and his methods are employed worldwide for neurodegenerative disease research. Diamond received his M.D. at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), where he worked with Keith Yamamoto as a Howard Hughes Medical Student Research Fellow and as a postdoctoral fellow. Since 2014, he has been a professor of neurology and neuroscience at Texas Southwestern Medical Center. He previously held faculty positions at UCSF and Washington University in St. Louis.

DDDiya Das ’12
Data Planning & Sharing Lead, Development Sciences Informatics Data Management, Genentech

Diya Das ’12 is data planning and sharing lead for the Developmental Science Informatics Data Management Team at Genentech, which manages exploratory biomarker data obtained in Roche clinical trials and collaborations. In this capacity, she has spearheaded the creation of processes that allow scientists to rapidly combine and reanalyze datasets to advance biomarker development, from ensuring that data adheres to the FAIR principles to enabling collaboration among scientists while respecting patient consents. She works closely with data managers, scientists, operations managers, engineers, contracts teams, data privacy consultants, legal counsel and information technology teams based in both North America and Europe. At Princeton, Das concentrated in molecular biology and earned a certificate in neuroscience. She was also a researcher in Sam Wang’s lab, where she studied canine neuroanatomy and behavior, and won the John Brinster ’43 Prize for her senior thesis. She then earned her Ph.D. in molecular and cell biology and did a short postdoc at the University of California, Berkeley, in John Ngai’s lab studying olfactory stem cell mediated tissue regeneration (or, why many mice and possibly humans retain their sense of smell as long as they do). Das was also a Moore-Sloan Fellow at the Berkeley Institute for Data Science, where she focused on advancing academic data science as a member of the Best Practices and Meta-Research working group and Career Paths and Alternative Metrics working group.

 

Details

Date:
May 20
Time:
8:45 am - 10:00 am
Event Categories:
, ,
Event Tags:
, , ,

Venue

McCosh 50
Princeton University
Princeton, NJ 08540 United States
Phone:
(609) 258 - 3000